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Hammer Time

Hammer
Hammer

Hammers are versatile hand tools used for a variety of tasks, from driving nails and removing screws to shaping metal and breaking concrete. In a retail hardware store, you can find several different types of hammers, each designed for a specific purpose. In this article, we will describe the various types of hammers available and cite relevant codes and standards that apply in a university theater using APA format.

  1. Claw Hammer: The most common type of hammer found in retail hardware stores is the claw hammer. It is used for driving nails and removing them with its clawed end. ANSI standard B11.23-2015 specifies safety requirements for the use of hand tools, including hammers. It recommends that workers use hammers with non-slip grips to prevent slips and falls.
  2. Sledgehammer: A sledgehammer is a large, heavy hammer used for breaking concrete, driving stakes, and other heavy-duty tasks. OSHA standard 1910.242 specifies that hand and portable powered tools shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. This includes using sledgehammers for their intended purpose and following the manufacturer’s instructions for use.
  3. Ball Peen Hammer: A ball peen hammer, also known as a machinist’s hammer, is used for shaping metal and other materials. Its rounded end is used for striking while the flat end is used for shaping. ANSI standard B11.23-2015 recommends that workers inspect their hammers before use to ensure that they are in good condition and working properly.
  4. Dead Blow Hammer: A dead blow hammer is a type of mallet with a hollow head filled with steel shot or sand. It is used for tasks that require precise force without damaging the surface being struck. NFPA 51B-2019 Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work recommends that workers use dead blow hammers when working in areas where flammable materials are present.
  5. Framing Hammer: A framing hammer, also known as a rip hammer, is used for framing and other construction tasks. It is heavier than a claw hammer and has a longer handle for added leverage. OSHA standard 1910.242(a) states that hand and portable powered tools shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, including using framing hammers for their intended purpose.
  6. Brick Hammer: A brick hammer, also known as a mason’s hammer, is used for cutting and shaping bricks and other masonry materials. Its chisel-shaped end is used for cutting while its blunt end is used for striking. ANSI standard B11.23-2015 recommends that workers use hammers with non-slip grips to prevent slips and falls.
  7. Welding Hammer: A welding hammer, also known as a chipping hammer, is used for removing slag and welding debris from welds. It has a pointed end for chipping and a flat end for cleaning. NFPA 51B-2019 Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work recommends that workers use welding hammers that are constructed of non-sparking materials when working in areas where flammable materials are present.

Safety Tips:

It is important to follow safety guidelines when using hammers in a university theater. ANSI standard B11.23-2015 specifies safety requirements for the use of hand tools, including hammers. Here are some general safety tips for using hammers in a theater setting:

  1. Always wear appropriate personal protective equipment, such as safety glasses and gloves, when using hammers.
  2. Use hammers for their intended purpose and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use.
  3. Inspect hammers before use to ensure that they are in good condition and working properly.
  4. Use hammers with non-slip

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